Groundwater Videos

Dr Badin Gibbes: Development and testing of distributed wireless sensor network for analysis of lake temperature

Presented by: Dr Badin Gibbes

SUMMARY
During 2009-2010 a novel wireless sensor network was developed and tested on Lake Wivenhoe, Brisbane, Australia. The network consisted of 45 water-based nodes, each equipped with six temperature sensors deployed at constant locations ranging from the water surface to a depth of 14 m. The system recorded data at 1 minute intervals over the entire deployment period and wirelessly transferred the data to an on-line data storage system.

This monitoring system provided an unprecedented level of spatial and temporal detail on the thermal dynamics within the reservoir. An analysis of this temperature sensor data provided valuable insights into lake processes. In particular new insights into the spatial variation of sub-daily temperature fluctuations were revealed. These processes might have implications for biogeochemical processes within the lake. Lessons learned from the design, deployment and operation of such large scale systems are also discussed.

ABOUT DR GIBBES
Dr Badin Gibbes is an environmental engineer with over 15 years experience in the field of water engineering.

In his current role with the University of Queensland’s School of Civil Engineering, Dr Gibbes leads the group’s lake and reservoir research program. This program uses a combination of innovative environmental monitoring systems and numerical models to assist water resource managers to better understand the key hydrodynamic and biogeochemical factors that influence water quality in water supply reservoirs. Dr Gibbes’ other research interests focus on the measurement and modelling of the complex interactions between surface water and groundwater systems.

Dr Gibbes also maintains an active involvement in the University of Queensland’s undergraduate and post-graduate teaching programs where he delivers lectures in various subjects including environmental issues and assessment, catchment hydrology, and modelling of surface water and groundwater systems.